Posts Tagged ‘Arduino’

Building the Internet of Things – Arduino and Ethernet (IOT)

Sunday, February 19th, 2012

Bubblino

Title: Building the Internet of Things – Arduino and Ethernet (IOT)
Location: MadLab
Description: Omniversity course exploring the Ethernet shield, which make an excellent platform to explore the Internet of Things.
Start Time: 10:00
Date: 2012-03-31
End Time: 17:30
Book a place

The Arduino boards have become the de facto choice for physical computing projects and, with the addition of an Ethernet shield, make an excellent platform on which to explore the Internet of Things.

Want your letterbox to email you whenever the postman has been? Needa clock to show you where your loved ones are? Or a glowing multi-coloured ambient orb to show your energy usage? This course will get you started on the road to realising your own Internet-connected projects.


Bubblino blowing tweet triggered bubbles

Real World Examples

Beside the Bubblino, check out this clock that tracks your loved ones.

What you need to be familiar with

You’ll need to know how to use your computer, edit files, and save them.

A familiarity with Arduino is also essential – we won’t be covering the Arduino basics. If you haven’t worked with Arduino before then you should take the Beginners guide to Arduino and Physical Computing course first.

Software and costs

The fee of the course is £135, and includes an Ethernet shield, selection of components, wires and cables.
arduino ethernet shield with mini sd connector
All software is freely available and copies will be distributed with the course materials on the day.
We will be using the Arduino IDE, version 0021, which can be downloaded from http://arduino.cc/en/Main/Software for all platforms.

Equipment you’ll need

You will need to bring a computer, ideally a laptop, with a recent version of Linux, Windows or OSX installed. You will need a USB interface on this computer. You’ll also need to bring an Arduino with you – either an Uno or a Duemilanove.

Suggested preparatory work

  • Install the Arduino IDE
  • Make sure the application starts and runs properly on your computer – on some Linux distributions, you need to install extra software.

About the tutor

The course is lead by Adrian McEwen, creator of the http://bubblino.com/family.

To prepare for the course

Beginners’ Guide to Arduino and Physical Computing

Thursday, February 16th, 2012

Arduino

Location: MadLab
Description: A course aimed at anyone who wants to learn about physical computing
Date: 09-06-2012
Start Time: 10:00
End Time: 17:30
Booking: Sign up here 








Arduino devices open up the exciting new world of physical computing, making real-world applications available even for non-experts to explore. The possible uses of these micro-controllers are limitless – all you need to add is your imagination.

This course tells you everything you need to know about working with the Arduino platform, from software development and simple circuit building, to prototyping new controllers and building robotics.

You’ll learn not only what you can achieve with Arduino boards, but also strategies for integrating them into larger projects, from installations to sensor networks.

And how could you use it? For functionality, for art… for making life more interesting.

Imagine a clock, with hands not telling the time, but where members of your family are by automatically sending back information about their movements. Imagine a bakery that can instantly send a tweet to its followers to tell them when their yummy baked goods are fresh out of the oven. Imagine a beautiful water-based display that spells out letters and numbers with bubbles.

Now imagine what you could do with it!

'Beginners Arduino & Physical Computing' Omniversity course components

Real World Examples

Here are some of our favourite projects using the Arduino:

What you need to be familiar with

You’ll need to know how to use your computer, edit files, and save them.

Some programming background is useful, but not essential; if you’ve ever written Javascript, Pascal, C, C++, Java or Actionscript, you’ll find the Arduino programming language very familiar. If you’ve written Macros in Excel or any desktop software, you’ll find this will help you understand what’s happening.

Software and costs

The fee of the course is £120. Included in this price is a hot buffet lunch, with vegetarian options (please notify us if you have other dietary requirements).

You will also receive an Arduino Uno, breadboard, holder, USB cable and parts bundle. Each parts bundle contains jumper wires, 2 pushbuttons, 2 potentiometers, resistors, 10 LEDs, and a photoresistor.

Additionally, you will receive an electronic copy of the teaching materials, software, and programmes we write on a USB stick.

All software is freely available and copies will be distributed with the course materials on the day.

We will be using the Arduino IDE, version 0021,  which can be downloaded from http://arduino.cc/en/Main/Software for all platforms.

We will also be using the Processing IDE, version 1.2.1, which can be downloaded from http://processing.org/download/ for all platforms.

Equipment you’ll need

You will need to bring a computer, ideally a laptop, with a recent version of  Linux, Windows or OSX installed. You will need a USB interface on this computer.

Suggested preparatory work

  • Install the Arduino IDE
  • Install the Processing IDE

Make sure both applications start and run properly on your computer – on some Linux distributions, you need to install extra software.

Familiarise yourself with the introduction to the Processing IDE (the Arduino IDE is based on it) at http://processing.org/learning/gettingstarted/

Learning Outcomes

  • How to connect and configure Arduino Uno devices to a computer, and download programmes to it
  • How to use a breadboard to prototype circuits, and interact with components through software
  • What different kinds of components exist and how to use photoresistor, potentiometers, and LEDs
  • How to communicate with an Arduino using USB and Processing
  • How to expand your Arduino and where to find devices and support

Further information

Course syllabus for Beginners’ Guide to Arduino and Physical Computing

Beginners’ Guide to Arduino and Physical Computing

Sunday, February 12th, 2012

Arduino

Title: Beginners’ Guide to Arduino and Physical Computing
Location: MadLab
Description: A course aimed at anyone who wants to learn about physical computing.
Date: 01-09-2012
Start Time: 10:00
End Time: 17:30
Booking: Sign up here

 

 

 

 

 

Arduino devices open up the exciting new world of physical computing, making real-world applications available even for non-experts to explore. The possible uses of these micro-controllers are limitless – all you need to add is your imagination.

'Beginners Arduino & Physical Computing' Omniversity course components

This course tells you everything you need to know about working with the Arduino platform, from software development and simple circuit building, to prototyping new controllers and building robotics.

You’ll learn not only what you can achieve with Arduino boards, but also strategies for integrating them into larger projects, from installations to sensor networks.

And how could you use it? For functionality, for art… for making life more interesting.

Imagine a clock, with hands not telling the time, but where members of your family are by automatically sending back information about their movements. Imagine a bakery that can instantly send a tweet to its followers to tell them when their yummy baked goods are fresh out of the oven. Imagine a beautiful water-based display that spells out letters and numbers with bubbles.

Now imagine what you could do with it!

Real World Examples

Here are some of our favourite projects using the Arduino:

What you need to be familiar with

You’ll need to know how to use your computer, edit files, and save them.

Some programming background is useful, but not essential; if you’ve ever written Javascript, Pascal, C, C++, Java or Actionscript, you’ll find the Arduino programming language very familiar. If you’ve written Macros in Excel or any desktop software, you’ll find this will help you understand what’s happening.

Software and costs

The fee of the course is £120. Included in this price is a hot buffet lunch, with vegetarian options (please notify us if you have other dietary requirements).

You will also receive an Arduino Uno, breadboard, holder, USB cable and parts bundle. Each parts bundle contains jumper wires, 2 pushbuttons, 2 potentiometers, resistors, 10 LEDs, and a photoresistor.

Additionally, you will receive an electronic copy of the teaching materials, software, and programmes we write on a USB stick.

All software is freely available and copies will be distributed with the course materials on the day.

We will be using the Arduino IDE, version 0021,  which can be downloaded from http://arduino.cc/en/Main/Software for all platforms.

We will also be using the Processing IDE, version 1.2.1, which can be downloaded from http://processing.org/download/ for all platforms.

Equipment you’ll need

You will need to bring a computer, ideally a laptop, with a recent version of  Linux, Windows or OSX installed. You will need a USB interface on this computer.

Suggested preparatory work

  • Install the Arduino IDE
  • Install the Processing IDE

Make sure both applications start and run properly on your computer – on some Linux distributions, you need to install extra software.

Familiarise yourself with the introduction to the Processing IDE (the Arduino IDE is based on it) at http://processing.org/learning/gettingstarted/

Learning Outcomes

  • How to connect and configure Arduino Uno devices to a computer, and download programmes to it
  • How to use a breadboard to prototype circuits, and interact with components through software
  • What different kinds of components exist and how to use photoresistor, potentiometers, and LEDs
  • How to communicate with an Arduino using USB and Processing
  • How to expand your Arduino and where to find devices and support

Further information

Course syllabus for Beginners’ Guide to Arduino and Physical Computing

 

Building the Internet of Things – Arduino and Ethernet

Wednesday, January 4th, 2012

Bubblino

Title: Building the Internet of Things – Arduino and Ethernet
Location: MadLab
Description: Omniversity course exploring the Ethernet shield, which make an excellent platform to explore the Internet of Things.
Date: 23-02-2013
Start Time: 10:00
End Time: 17:30
Booking: Sign up here

 

 

 

 

Arduino boards have become the de-facto choice for physical computing projects and, with the addition of an Ethernet Shield, make an excellent platform on which to explore the Internet of Things.

Want your letterbox to email you whenever the postman has been? Need a clock to show you where your loved ones are? Or a glowing multi-colouredambient orb to show your energy usage? This course will get you started on the road to realising your own Internet-connected projects.
arduino ethernet shield with mini sd connector

Real World Examples

Bubblino blowing Twitter powered bubbles

What you need to be familiar with

A familiarity with Arduino is also essential – we won’t be covering the Arduino basics. If you haven’t worked with Arduino before then you should take the Beginners’ Guide to Arduino and Physical Computingcourse first.

Learning Outcomes

  • How to add an Ethernet Shield to an Arduino Uno device and how to connect and configure it to access the Internet
  • How the HTTP protocol works, and how to use it to talk to web servers
  • How to use libraries like HttpClient and TextFinder to ease the programming
  • How to use a breadboard to prototype circuits, and interact with components through software
  • How to use temperature sensors and RGB LEDs

Software and costs

The course is £135 – which includes an Ethernet Shield and a selection of components, wires and cables.

All software is freely available and copies will be distributed with the course materials on the day.

We will be using the Arduino IDE, version 1.0.1 or later, which can be downloaded from http://arduino.cc/en/Main/Software for all platforms.

Equipment you’ll need

You will need to bring a computer, ideally a laptop, with a recent version of Linux, Windows or OSX installed. You will need a USB interface on this computer. You’ll also need to bring an Arduino with you – either an Uno or a Duemilanove. You can purchase an Ardunio Uno on the day at MadLab. Lunch and refreshments are provided.

Suggested preparatory work

  • Install the Arduino IDE
  • Make sure the application starts and runs properly on your computer – on some Linux distributions, you need to install extra software.

About the tutor

Best known for Twitter-watching bubble machine Bubblino, Adrian McEwen has been connecting interesting things to the Internet since 1995. He looks after the Arduino Ethernet library and runs IoT consultancy and product company MCQN. You can find him on twitter as @amcewen

Internet of Things – One Learners Experience

Thursday, March 10th, 2011

MadLab has recently started the Omniversity, a programme of professional training courses. One of the courses was an Advance Arduino course exploring the Internet of Things, where we were able to award a bursary to one attendee. Paul Plowman talks about his experience.


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